Julie Herzigova

Julie continued her career of a nurse participating in Inligra charity medical program in Nairobi, Kenya.

Today one of the most serious problems in the world is the threat of terrorism and extremism. Efforts of all states are aimed at combatting terrorism, overshadowed by the wayside of terror - the work with children and families affected by terrorist action. With a view of providing psychological, medical, social, material and other charitable aid to children and families affected by terror, as well as military families, killed in the line of duty and orphans, Charity Organization was established.

With a view of providing psychological, medical, social, material and other charitable aid to children and families affected by terror, as well as military families, killed in the line of duty and orphans, Inligra Charity Organization was established.

Helping is a trillion-dollar industry. Despite the bad economy, there is never a shortage of altruistic souls willing to give money or lend a hand to disadvantaged children or for the cure of a disease. However, as noble as the idea of charity may be, there are some realities about charities that are not all puppies and rainbows.

Both charity organizations and donors do things, intentionally or not, that hinder the very idea of helping. We aren’t trying to discourage anyone from giving to charities, but you’d be silly to donate without an objective look at what goes on behind the scenes of charity work.

We would most often associate aggressive, expensive, drawn-out trademark lawsuits with big commercial corporations. It turns out charities love those trademarks, too. Apparently, breast cancer charity Komen owns the phrase “for the cure,” and this has been used noticeably by other non-profits like Kites for a Cure.